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Evaluating Learner Motivation, Engagement and Retention

The Impact of Story-Based Back Injury Prevention Video Training on Learner Motivation, Engagement, and Retention

Objective:

Examine the impact of story- and video-based back injury prevention training on learner motivation, engagement, and retention.

Background:

The proliferation of greater access to and investment in online learning creates more opportunities for video instruction. Developing video instruction—especially story-based modules utilizing creative writers, actors, set, costumes, etc.—requires a greater investment in resources, namely time and cost. While studies show that video can be an effective medium for healthcare training, there is a lack of research examining the effects of media choice on motivation, engagement, and retention. We will examine the impact of story-based video training on learner motivation, engagement, and retention, while controlling for age, gender, and race/ethnicity. 

Methods:

The study will be a randomized controlled trial in which the experimental group receives a half-hour story-based video training on back injury prevention. The control group will receive the same overall content and course length but the training will be more text-based and not include a story-based video presentation. Specific measures for all participants will include the “motivation to learn” questions from the E-Learning Usability Evaluation Questionnaire [1](motivation), course completion rates (engagement), and questions testing knowledge immediately after taking the course and at 90-days post-course (retention). Participants will also complete survey questions about course features during the posttest. We will address the questions of this study using logistic regression and analysis of variance procedures. 


[1] Zaharias, P. Developing a usability evaluation method for e-learning applications: beyond functional usability. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction Vol 25 (1), January 2009, 75-98.