WEBINAR

Top 10 Things Teachers Should Try

Behavior Management in the Classroom

Behavior management in the classroom is a skill that takes years to develop. Learn from Dr. Amanda Kelly, PhD, BCBA-D, aka Behavior Babe, as she presents lessons learned from years in the field of behavior management. Participants will get 10 useful tips that they can apply right away to their educational settings.

During this webinar, you’ll learn how to:

  • Helpful tips for preventing behavior-related problems
  • Proactive recommendations for setting reinforcing expectations
  • Realistic and practical suggestions to improving behavior in the classroom
Date: On-Demand
Duration: 45 minutes + Q&A

Presenter

Amanda Kelly

Dr. Amanda N. Kelly, PhD, BCBA-D

President, Hawaii Association for Behavioral Analysis

On-Demand Webinar

 

Classroom Organization

One of the most basic tools of behavior management is classroom organization.

Establish a system

The first recommendation to help teachers with behavior management is to have an organizational system and make that system clear to the students. When students know where things are and what the expectations are for using those items, it is easier for them to meet those expectations.

Do students know where to find their pencils and where to put their homework? Knowing these things may seem natural, but sometimes students don’t. Articulate the system, but also be prepared to make alternations for student-specific needs.

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Classroom Rules

When managing behavior in large classes, we often forget how to give life to those rules.

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Establish a system

The first recommendation to help teachers with behavior management is to have an organizational system and make that system clear to the students. When students know where things are and what the expectations are for using those items, it is easier for them to meet those expectations.

Do students know where to find their pencils and where to put their homework? Knowing these things may seem natural, but sometimes students don’t. Articulate the system, but also be prepared to make alternations for student-specific needs.

Modeling and Practice

It is essential to model expectations for the students.

Interactive modeling

Modeling behaviors and skills in a classroom can range from demonstrating how to add one plus one, to showing students how to push in their chairs or line up single-file. The key to successful modeling is multiple repeated opportunities for students to practice, especially for behaviors that are difficult for them.

Model, ask students what they notice about the behavior, and then ask one student to show the group again. This type of modeling and practice can go a long way in preventing behavioral challenges in the classroom.

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Making Every Statement Count

It is so important to say what you mean and really mean it.

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Following through

Life isn’t perfect, classrooms are hectic, and teachers cannot facilitate every student interaction. But if you do make a statement, it is important that you follow through with it. Students who are struggling with behavior will tend to generalize the lack of follow-through and begin to interpret every adult statement as having no consequences.

Everything you say is important, so if needed reduce what you say to make sure that every statement counts. Read the classroom dynamic, recognize any possible obstacles on a particular day, and set expectations that you can follow through with on that day.