<p><img src="//relias.innocraft.cloud/piwik.php?idsite=2&amp;rec=1" style="border:0;" alt=""> It’s Not Your Mother’s Infection Control Program Any More
By | January 15, 2016

I happened across the recent article in McKnight’s about the new three-year pilot program regarding infection control and prevention.

Beginning this year, ten pilot surveys will be conducted in nursing homes across the country.  In FY 2017 and 2018, hospitals will be added to the mix.

These pilot surveys will be designed to give healthcare facilities guidance on improving prevention for urinary tract infections, diarrheal diseases such as C. diff and other infections commonly found in nursing homes.

The article also mentions that while no citations will be issued as part of the program, referrals will be made to the CMS Regional Office if any Immediate Jeopardy deficiencies are found, according to the memo.  The lone comment from “Bucky” on the article was pretty funny.  Make sure you see that one when you visit the article!

As an aside, I’ve also been reading quite a bit on the increase of antibiotic resistant infections that are on the rise.  Being from Tennessee, the superbug capital of the world (thanks, Tennessee), I notice stuff like that.

 

Infection Control in Long Term Care.

According to the CDC, drug-resistant infections account for 2 million infections and lead to 23,000 deaths in the United States per year.

In our long term care population, our residents see an 8 times greater risk of contracting E.Coli – the most common bug responsible for gastrointestinal disease, UTIs and wound infections.  And of particular note is the E. Coli strain ST131.   This is a particularly nasty strain of E.Coli that is increasing in sheer number in the overall geriatric population, and especially those in long term care.  It has the added distinction of being antibiotic resistant.  If you want more information on this bug, see this article published in the Society of Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

I also found another article I wanted to share.  This article is about using a specific drug protocol (which I wont get into, or endorse in any way).  However, the first half of this article has some great statistics you might want to use in your teaching and training efforts regarding how and why these bugs happen.  Check it out when you get a chance.

Here at Relias, we are committed to helping you communicate, teach and train to provide the safest and very best care for your residents.  We can help you design, launch and track effective training and communication initiatives that support your infection control programs.

It doesn’t matter if you are designing your baseline training, or have received a tag and need to retrain, we have the tools and courseware you need.

Infection control and the rise of these resistant bugs is a battle we will continue to face.  Your efforts in this regard are appreciated and to be applauded.  I know another survey focus is probably not welcome news, but this is an area that is constantly changing as drug resistance complicates the fight.

Bucky, if you see this, give me a call!  We’d love to help!

Jan Wilson

Director of Learning Designs and Outcomes at Relias, Jan brings over 25 years of technology, human resources and learning expertise to the Relias Learning team. Her experience in senior care spans more than a decade, including serving as a senior executive of learning strategy with one of the country's largest providers. As an organizational development consultant, she has provided strategic planning, process alignment, curriculum development and planning and learning solutions to a variety of clients in pharma, healthcare, and state governments.

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